Making The Switch - Bike to Trike - Great Info!

How long have you been a trike owner?

  • Never owned a bike or trike but thinking of getting a trike.

    Votes: 68 3.9%
  • Currently own a bike and thinking of switching to a trike.

    Votes: 273 15.9%
  • First owned a trike 0 - 1 year ago.

    Votes: 672 39.0%
  • First owned a trike 1 - 2 years ago.

    Votes: 176 10.2%
  • First owned a trike 2 - 3 years ago.

    Votes: 123 7.1%
  • First owned a trike 3 - 4 years ago.

    Votes: 96 5.6%
  • First owned a trike 4 - 5 years ago.

    Votes: 76 4.4%
  • First owned a trike more than 5 years ago.

    Votes: 238 13.8%

  • Total voters
    1,722
Hello all, I'm just getting back into riding and couldn't be more excited! I had ridden bikes long ago when I was in my early 20s and absolutely loved it. Then I had kids and priorities changed. Now, all of that is behind me but I've aged a bit, and found that a two wheeler was just not as comfortable anymore. I bought a new Harley Tri-glide in the cool "Snake Venom" paint a week ago and have almost 600 miles on it already.

With the above said, I have several observations and questions to put to the group.

1. I thought I had a big butt before, but with the trike, I really have to be conscious of where my rear tires/fenders are. I've not hit anything yet, but have been close a few times.

2. Left turns from a stop are still quite stressful. It just seems like pushing/pulling the bike through the turn, needing to shift, and not rolling my right wrist unintentionally is a lot to concentrate all at once. I'm sure that this will become a lot smother as I gain more experience, but for now it is difficult. Does anyone have any tips/techniques that could help with this?

3. Windshield choice. The standard windshield on a new Tri-glide is only 10 inches and I'm 6'3" tall, so my helmet is getting pushed around quite a bit on the freeway. I ordered a 12" touring model windshield from Freedom Shields (https://freedomshields.net/product/tri-glide-windshield/) and hope that will help resolve the buffeting that I'm dealing with. The touring model is also a couple of inches wider to help block the wind on the sides. Has anyone used a Freedom Windshield and what did you think?

4. Freeway pegs have been a life saver for my back. Being tall, and not so thin around the waist, I really feel like I'm almost sitting on top of the tank. The freeway pegs really help me to be able to stretch my legs out a little and alleviate a lot of the back strain.

5.Most of all, I'm having a great time with my new bike!

View attachment 101556

Hi Todd and welcome to Trike Talk

The left turns issues will soon become memory for you, that said if you still struggle I would chose an empty parking lot and practice. This will help to further develop your memory muscle and give you more confidence
 
Hi Todd and welcome to Trike Talk

The left turns issues will soon become memory for you, that said if you still struggle I would chose an empty parking lot and practice. This will help to further develop your memory muscle and give you more confidence

Thanks Jack, I can only hope this is true. Just kidding, I'm finding it easier every day, but it sure was intimidating at first.
 
Hello all, I'm just getting back into riding and couldn't be more excited! I had ridden bikes long ago when I was in my early 20s and absolutely loved it. Then I had kids and priorities changed. Now, all of that is behind me but I've aged a bit, and found that a two wheeler was just not as comfortable anymore. I bought a new Harley Tri-glide in the cool "Snake Venom" paint a week ago and have almost 600 miles on it already.

With the above said, I have several observations and questions to put to the group.

1. I thought I had a big butt before, but with the trike, I really have to be conscious of where my rear tires/fenders are. I've not hit anything yet, but have been close a few times.

2. Left turns from a stop are still quite stressful. It just seems like pushing/pulling the bike through the turn, needing to shift, and not rolling my right wrist unintentionally is a lot to concentrate all at once. I'm sure that this will become a lot smother as I gain more experience, but for now it is difficult. Does anyone have any tips/techniques that could help with this?

3. Windshield choice. The standard windshield on a new Tri-glide is only 10 inches and I'm 6'3" tall, so my helmet is getting pushed around quite a bit on the freeway. I ordered a 12" touring model windshield from Freedom Shields (https://freedomshields.net/product/tri-glide-windshield/) and hope that will help resolve the buffeting that I'm dealing with. The touring model is also a couple of inches wider to help block the wind on the sides. Has anyone used a Freedom Windshield and what did you think?

4. Freeway pegs have been a life saver for my back. Being tall, and not so thin around the waist, I really feel like I'm almost sitting on top of the tank. The freeway pegs really help me to be able to stretch my legs out a little and alleviate a lot of the back strain.

5.Most of all, I'm having a great time with my new bike!

View attachment 101556

Todd...............Welcome to trike talk.............:clapping:..
 
I use chap stick,

I have been triking about 15 years. 11 years on a VW based Trike Shop Runabout, the past 4 or so on a 1995 GW1500 Motor Trike. Feel free to pick my brain (such as it is)! Pics of both are posted in the garage.

For new trikers, especially those coming from a 2 wheeler, a few tips:

-Keep that front wheel in the middle of your lane.

-Point the front wheel in the direction you want to turn (no countersteering!)

-Don't put your feet down at a stop.

-If you think you will be able to reach out and touch something to the side, you're too close! Watch out for curbs, toll booth & gas pump barrier poles, etc.

-When you hit a pothole or bump with one of your rear wheels, the bars will shake a bit. Don't worry, this is normal. The effect is a little more pronounced with solid axle rear ends.

-Add extra time at stops on a ride for answering questions from interested folks asking questions about your ride, from both two wheel riders and nonriders. (We could retire if we got $1 from every little kid we gave a quick 5 minute ride around a parking lot, and a couple of parents, too.)

-Don't worry about the small decrease in gas mileage. You now carry more weight, bigger wheels (and an extra one) and there are 2 air brakes right behind you, also known as "fenders"

-The soreness around your mouth and cheeks is from the extra big smile you will have for hours at a time. It doesn't go away, but don't worry - you'll get used to it.:D

I use chap stick for that smile.
 
old questions but need advice

I have rebuilt a trike wrecked a Champion kit and now has Harley DNA rear end. The champion set up worked awesome. It is a Yamaha 1700 which i bought triked and wrecked. I couldn't get another replacement Champion kit so I bought the DNA Harley and a shop ADAPTED it. The kit came with dual piston calipers and would never get right. Would either lock up and release after time or not stop it. Since the old kit had single piston calipers i changed it back to single pistons. have bled, changed master and now it will stop but to get good (has never been great since Champion kit) if i pump it a couple times. you can feel it initially engage but to truly stop it needs to be pumped a couple times. Have tried a proportioning valve and didnt do a noticeable thing.

Do any of you PROS and SEASONED trikers have any other ideas? I need major HELP!!!!!!!!!
 
I have rebuilt a trike wrecked a Champion kit and now has Harley DNA rear end. The champion set up worked awesome. It is a Yamaha 1700 which i bought triked and wrecked. I couldn't get another replacement Champion kit so I bought the DNA Harley and a shop ADAPTED it. The kit came with dual piston calipers and would never get right. Would either lock up and release after time or not stop it. Since the old kit had single piston calipers i changed it back to single pistons. have bled, changed master and now it will stop but to get good (has never been great since Champion kit) if i pump it a couple times. you can feel it initially engage but to truly stop it needs to be pumped a couple times. Have tried a proportioning valve and didnt do a noticeable thing.

Do any of you PROS and SEASONED trikers have any other ideas? I need major HELP!!!!!!!!!

Gene......Post this again on the Freewheeler Forum, And hopefully our resident Brake Guru.....Jack Klarich will see this and chime in...
 
Thanks it sounded strange until I tried it. I personally just stand on the left peg with left foot and swing my right leg over the tank/ wife does the same way, before I get on and then just hops back on her seat using the rider boards . but I put the video together so they could see just what u was takin about.

actually, that was very helpful
 
little yellow poles

I have been triking about 15 years. 11 years on a VW based Trike Shop Runabout, the past 4 or so on a 1995 GW1500 Motor Trike. Feel free to pick my brain (such as it is)! Pics of both are posted in the garage.

For new trikers, especially those coming from a 2 wheeler, a few tips:

-Keep that front wheel in the middle of your lane.

-Point the front wheel in the direction you want to turn (no countersteering!)

-Don't put your feet down at a stop.

-If you think you will be able to reach out and touch something to the side, you're too close! Watch out for curbs, toll booth & gas pump barrier poles, etc.

-When you hit a pothole or bump with one of your rear wheels, the bars will shake a bit. Don't worry, this is normal. The effect is a little more pronounced with solid axle rear ends.

-Add extra time at stops on a ride for answering questions from interested folks asking questions about your ride, from both two wheel riders and nonriders. (We could retire if we got $1 from every little kid we gave a quick 5 minute ride around a parking lot, and a couple of parents, too.)

-Don't worry about the small decrease in gas mileage. You now carry more weight, bigger wheels (and an extra one) and there are 2 air brakes right behind you, also known as "fenders"

-The soreness around your mouth and cheeks is from the extra big smile you will have for hours at a time. It doesn't go away, but don't worry - you'll get used to it.:D

You must know My Wifes Driving LOL :laugh:
 

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