Maybe silly but serious question, so I'll ask anyway.

AriNV

20+ Posts
Apr 19, 2024
20
21
Las Vegas, NV, USA
I have driven manual and automatic cars and, obviously, the way you go from a full stop on a slope is different.

On a manual transmission, you apply the manual brake, accelerate enough for the hood of the car to "sink" then you release the brakes.

On an automatic transmission, the car stays where it is (doesn't go backwards), you just gently accelerate and you're good to go.

What is the procedure on a semi-automatic trike like the Spyder? I had this question on my mind for quite a while. If it is a silly question, at least I hope you had a good laugh about it. :laugh:
 
I have driven manual and automatic cars and, obviously, the way you go from a full stop on a slope is different.

On a manual transmission, you apply the manual brake, accelerate enough for the hood of the car to "sink" then you release the brakes.

On an automatic transmission, the car stays where it is (doesn't go backwards), you just gently accelerate and you're good to go.

What is the procedure on a semi-automatic trike like the Spyder? I had this question on my mind for quite a while. If it is a silly question, at least I hope you had a good laugh about it. :laugh:

In my opinion, no question is silly if you are seeking valuable input.

So, you went from cars to bikes - and, they are two different animals. For the car, you mentioned that you applied the brakes and accelerated enough for the hood to sink. I do not follow that practice. If you have one foot on the clutch, one on the brake - then, there isn't a third foot to accelerate in the car.

Instead, I usually hood the clutch down and apply the break (car in gear). When ready to move forward, I then accelerate and gently release the clutch. This holds the car.

Now on the bike, for me, it is somewhat different. I have a trike -so, the same might apply to your spider. Leave the unit in gear and hold the brake. When ready to move forward, just release the brake.

In my case, my trike had what is call "Vehicle Hold control" or hill assist. I hold that in and the bike stays still. When ready to move, I put the bike in gear and roll the throttle.

Hope this helps.
 
In my opinion, no question is silly if you are seeking valuable input.

So, you went from cars to bikes - and, they are two different animals. For the car, you mentioned that you applied the brakes and accelerated enough for the hood to sink. I do not follow that practice. If you have one foot on the clutch, one on the brake - then, there isn't a third foot to accelerate in the car.

Instead, I usually hood the clutch down and apply the break (car in gear). When ready to move forward, I then accelerate and gently release the clutch. This holds the car.

Now on the bike, for me, it is somewhat different. I have a trike -so, the same might apply to your spider. Leave the unit in gear and hold the brake. When ready to move forward, just release the brake.

In my case, my trike had what is call "Vehicle Hold control" or hill assist. I hold that in and the bike stays still. When ready to move, I put the bike in gear and roll the throttle.

Hope this helps.

It did help, and thank you, but when I learned to drive (half a century ago), there was a hand (manual) brake. That's how you started on a hill. One foot on the clutch, one on the accelerator, and right hand on the brakes. Our instructor would put an egg behind the front wheel. If you broke the egg, you failed the test. :laugh:
 
IMO a good read thru your owners manual and or here on the Forums asking for help is a good way to get more familiar with more info

Practice and muscle memory is key to any projects, check the threads and read some of the Stickies posted for more info, Best of luck and check back in often;)
 
It did help, and thank you, but when I learned to drive (half a century ago), there was a hand (manual) brake. That's how you started on a hill. One foot on the clutch, one on the accelerator, and right hand on the brakes. Our instructor would put an egg behind the front wheel. If you broke the egg, you failed the test. :laugh:

Yep, I remember that hand brake - we only used that once we parked the car. It's all about the timing.
 
What is the procedure on a semi-automatic trike like the Spyder? I had this question on my mind for quite a while. If it is a silly question, at least I hope you had a good laugh about it.

You might want to visit the website called Spyderlovers.com.

It is dedicated strictly to the Can-Am Spyders and Rykers. Many of the same questions and concerns you have, have been addressed there by seasoned riders for several years. Plus, the members are very generous with their vast knowledge of, and experience with, the vehicles. Asking questions and gaining information ahead of a purchase is always a good thing.
 
What is the procedure on a semi-automatic trike like the Spyder? I had this question on my mind for quite a while. If it is a silly question, at least I hope you had a good laugh about it.

You might want to visit the website called Spyderlovers.com.

It is dedicated strictly to the Can-Am Spyders and Rykers. Many of the same questions and concerns you have, have been addressed there by seasoned riders for several years. Plus, the members are very generous with their vast knowledge of, and experience with, the vehicles. Asking questions and gaining information ahead of a purchase is always a good thing.

Thank you paws for your kind answer!
 
Take your foot off the brake and twist the grip and away you go. The more you twist the faster you go.

Paul is right, don't over think it. It's super easy and very instinctive, just ask Carla, she's owned Honda Goldwing trikes and now owns a spyder, and maybe others I'm not aware of. I think that one of the more attractive and interesting aspects of our community is its diversity of people and machines. Most of us here have owned a variety of brands and styles and aren't limited by blind loyalty to any single brand or style.
 
Paul is right, don't over think it. It's super easy and very instinctive, just ask Carla, she's owned Honda Goldwing trikes and now owns a spider, and maybe others I'm not aware of. I think that one of the more attractive and interesting aspects of our community is its diversity of people and machines. Most of us here have owned a variety of brands and styles and aren't limited by blind loyalty to any single brand or style.

Thanks, Papa!
 

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